December 13, 2017, 17:30

President Parched: Trump Pulls a ‘Little Marco’ During Asia Speech

President Parched: Trump Pulls a ‘Little Marco’ During Asia Speech

During US President Donald Trump’s first remarks following his trip across Asia, the US leader committed a grave sin: drinking out of a water bottle during a TV appearance.

“They don’t have water? That’s okay,” Trump said Wednesday after fumbling around to find something to rehydrate during a verbose speech. The president’s remarks largely served as another self-promotion segment about how respected America is in the eyes of the rest of the world, how unemployment is at a 17-year-low and how the US stock market has added trillions of dollars in value, all because of Trump.

Then Trump reached down below the lectern again and found a bottle of Fiji water, and a new meme was born.

​Drinking bottled water during a TV appearance is a big deal in Trump’s eyes. Following Senator Marco Rubio’s very awkward response to President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address in 2013, during which he took a break in the middle of his segment to chug some H2O, Trump quipped, “next time Marco Rubio should drink his water from a glass as opposed to a bottle — would have much less negative impact.”

​Trump took another swipe at Little Marco on the campaign trail for the same incident.

​Marco Rubio couldn’t even respond properly to President Obama’s State of the Union Speech without pouring sweat & chugging water. He choked!

​”When they put Marco on to refute President Obama’s speech — do you remember that catastrophe? And he’s like this. Huh. Huh. I need water. Help me, I need water. Help. And this is live television,” Trump said in February 2016, before calling the Florida senator is a “total choke artist.”

It seems the shoe is now on the other foot.

​And Trump didn’t just sip — he stopped later to really guzzle from the pricey Fiji bottle.​

​Of course, Trump has been traveling quite a bit, and plane cabin air has very low humidity, which can lead to dehydration. Experts say climate-controlled environments on airplanes can feature relative humidity of just 10 to 15 percent, or roughly three times drier than the Sahara desert.

Sourse: sputniknews.com

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