December 13, 2019, 2:55

US Senate Panel Seeks Missing Russia, WikiLeaks-Related Documents From Kushner

US Senate Panel Seeks Missing Russia, WikiLeaks-Related Documents From Kushner

A lawyer representing President Donald Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner has been given a November 27 deadline to produce documents related to Kushner’s Russia-related communications during the 2016 US presidential campaign and transition.

WASHINGTON (Sputnik) — According to a letter from Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley and Ranking Democrat Senator Dianne Feinstein, a lawyer who represents Donald Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner has been given a November 27 deadline to produce documents related to Kushner’s Russia-related communications during the 2016 US presidential campaign and transition.

The letter addressed to attorney Abbe Lowell of the Norton Rose Fullbright law firm in Washington, DC, seeks several documents that are “known to exist” but were not provided by Kushner in three earlier requests.

“For example, other parties have produced September 2016 email communications to Mr. Kushner concerning WikiLeaks, which Mr. Kushner then forwarded to another campaign official,” the letter stated on Thursday. “Likewise, other parties have produced documents concerning a ‘Russian backdoor overture and dinner invite,’ which Mr. Kushner also forwarded.”

In addition, the letter requests copies of transcripts of Kushner’s testimony to other congressional committees that are also investigating links between Trump aides and Russia.

The letter seeks copies of communications between Kushner and former White House Chief of Staff Michael Flynn that contain any of 26 words, most of which are names or terms associated with congressional investigations of purported Russian meddling in the 2016 US presidential election. Russia denies the allegations.

The Flynn list includes: “Putin,” “Lavrov,” “Gazprom,” “Ukraine,” “Turkey,” “Guccifer,”  “Rosneft,” “sanctions” and “WikiLeaks.”

The letter requests a copy of a questionnaire apparently filled out in Kushner’s application for a security clearance, a document that Kushner previously declined to provide to the Judiciary Committee.

“With regard to your claim that the documents are confidential, while the Privacy Act limits the government’s authority to release the information provided to it, there is no restriction on your client’s ability to provide that information to Congress,” the letter said.

The letter also accepted an earlier offer from Kushner to review un-redacted versions of the requested documents at the law firm’s offices. It concluded with a request to produce all requested documents no later than November 27, 2017.

Source: sputniknews.com

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